Category: Scholarly Blogs (Munich 2012)

0

Writing blog posts takes too much time, they say…

I give you my quintessence of the last 2 papers of the Weblogs conference – In a short, but intense paper, Hubertus Kohle presents a series of theses. The first one being that blogging and a peer review is a contradiction in terms. The quality of a blog post, says Kohle, depends on its quick access, on its making a good and clear point, on it being short – all qualities that get lost if you want to fit in the criteria of traditional scholarly peer-reviewing. He also states: the posts that are most commented  are the shortest and most...

1

Blog-ray exposure (Weblogs in Munich Part 3)

The first afternoon session presents existing blogs. Maybe I will finally understand what makes a good blog. So far, my conclusion was that the traffic on a blog defines its official success. But on the other hand, a scholarly blog with 15 visitors that are “the right ones” is also considered successful. All in all, I still don’t understand what success looks like for a scholarly blog. The number of visits combined with the number of quotations or links? The number of commentaries? The number of tweets? Or maybe nothing that could be summarized in numbers? Let’s see… Eva Pfanzelter...

1

Blogportale hier und da (a tribute to Mareike König)

Ein Thema, das alle Beiträge der Weblog-Konferenz soweit durchzieht, ist wohl die Frage nach der Qualitätssicherung. Wissenschaftliche Standards wie peer-review lassen sich bei Blogs wohl nicht realisieren und ich glaube, genau insofern ist es wichtig, die Funktion der wissenschaftlichen Blogportale zu definieren. Marc Scheloske unterstreicht die Rolle der  Blogportale für den Wissenschaftler, um an das Publikum heranzukommen, sich zu vernetzen. Er liefert das Rezept, gibt die statistische Menge an Blogposts an, die nötig ist, um erfolgreich zu sein (mindestens einmal die Woche, 2/3 Mal ist besser). Das Einzige, was mir offensichtlich noch fehlt, um mit meinem Blog erfolgreich zu sein,...

0

Scholarly blogging on scholarly blogging Part One

When I finally managed to get off the hypnotic fixation on the twitterwall, I realised that Cornelius Puschmann was trying to sort out the writing process of scholarly blogs. There are, of course, ways of putting up objective functions of scholarly writing. I find the three main functions he lists (taking notes, publishing results, doing PR-work) make sense. But on the other hand you seldom write for one reason, one adressee. You always somehow write for yourself and for yourself to be read. The question of the relationship between blogger and readers is at the heart of the next paper....

0

Beyond Virtual and Real

So it is raining in Munich, day before the big bloggers’ meeting.  My feelings are mixed. What I thought would be a relatively confidential conference turns out to be an event with over hundred participants – all likely to be listening to the talks and blogging and twitting at the same time; this will be one of the loudest silences ever. On the other hand, I am granting myself a break from a daily work that has gone beyond humanity, so I should really be, mainly, enjoying this. And I am, too. To begin with, I had a Sencha Tea...