Monthly Archive: October 2015

0

Those invisible forces

In her brilliant closing keynote of the TEI conference in Lyon, Charlotte Roueché exposed research questions in such a way that they seemed inseparable from what one could consider are infrastructural challenges, but are in truth also methodological or even political principles. Talking about the TEI community was the ideal setting for considerations on the competences, the communication means, the aspirations it takes for a community like that of the Digital Humanities to emerge. Charlotte Roueché’s diagnosis that the success of humanities research based on digital methods depends on how easily you might be able to find the right person...

0

Connect & animate – & correspondences, again

The TEI Conference 2015 is now in full swing. After the opening keynote by Milad Doueihi that took us through the depths of literate coding yesterday, today’s program began with both a panel and a paper session which made me regret my lack of ubiquity. The panel dealt with the contribution of infrastructures and repositories to the development of TEI-based projects and DH research at large. I had the privilege to officiate as Laurent Romary’s substitute in that panel where a vivid discussion engaged between the panelists (Julia Flanders, Sibylle Söring, Thomas Kollatz and me) and between the panelists and...

0

Open Access to Quality

There is this nagging problem in literary studies. How do we teach our students to make the difference between a googlebooks scan and a good digital edition? In order to avoid admitting that they don’t know the answer to this question, most literary scholars refuse any quotation of any digital source in term papers. Since some may be rotten, then we’d better consider them all unusable. It will protect us from contamination. At least, with books, we know what the deal is about. The big, expensive, hardcover books are the good ones. Some softcover are o.k. for students to quote from....

0

Digital Science (excentric and mundane)

The “Digital Science Match” takes place tomorrow. 100 researchers from Berlin working in the digital area (which turns out to encompass quite a wide range of topics) have 3 minutes each to present their research. Yet another occasion to rejoice about my last name beginning with a B: I am the first one to speak in my session, at 3 P.M. I don’t know how receptive people will be in the afternoon, but hey! I have a 3 minute-pitch for you! Three minutes  is a tricky format, even for the first speaker of the session.