Digital Intellectuals Blog


Fight for gold, excommunications and vampires: a day in the life at Gut Siggen

While the conference (which I also mentioned in my previous post) is aiming at a manifesto-esque text production on the future of digital scholarly publishing, I had to leave this morning and promised a contribution in the form of a blogpost. The following hence recapitulates the content of my presentation of yesterday, some of the following discussion (partly integrated in my argument to make it more explicit), and puts these in the wider context of the topic addressed at Gut Siggen. I could have talked about reputation, about peer review, about blogging, but there were other experts to talk about that....


By the sea

After the TEI Conference in Vienna and the ESTS/DiXiT conference in Antwerp, I am now staying at Gut Siggen for a conference (rather: work session) on digital scholarly publications this week. It took me a while to find a spot with stable internet access between these thick, old walls but finally found it (and luckily, it comes with a comfortable chair). Although I won’t be able to enjoy it fully since I have to head back to Berlin tomorrow morning, the concept of the seminars held here is in many ways attractive: one week by the sea to talk, argue,...


The de facto standard

There is this hate/love affaire between DH and the TEI, which seems to me to be best expressed in the way DH scholars call the TEI the “de facto standard”. It’s not the standard you’d wish, but it is recommended, especially by the funding agencies who give money to DH projects. Also, it works, you can actually do things with the TEI that won’t disappear tomorrow. Of course, it is sooo heavy machinery compared to the time and funding you actually get from the funding agencies. But bummer. De facto, it is the standard. 


Thinking & drafting & drafting & drafting

In the midst of developing work on the Data Re-Use Charter I mentioned in the previous post, I am discovering a new way of developing ideas, which does not involve taking notes, reading long books, and writing complex argumentations. While the first idea of the Charter was tending towards a final product that would be a one-page paper one can physically sign, it soon evolved towards a web page, and then towards a modulable web page. On this web page, each of the different actors invited to join in the Charter partnership has to sign in and then select the blocks of text he/she wants...